Console Wrapper

Some ConsoleWrapper changes

Have spent a bit of time working on ConsoleWrapper today: Fixed a major memory leak that was causing memory usage to climb indefinitely, until it caused ConsoleWrapper to crash. This was obviously a Bad Thing™. Memory usage now sits at a comfortable ~24MB on startup, and doesn’t increase significantly with use. Added a new built-in command (i.e. that doesn’t utilise CMD) for viewing images inline within ConsoleWrapper. Usage is VIEW IMAGENAME, where IMAGENAME is a valid image path.
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New ConsoleWrapper version released!

ConsoleWrapper has had another large overhaul over the last few weeks. The primary focus of the release has been creating an internal shell which will serve as a base for growing and improving ConsoleWrapper in the future. This internal shell supports a number of simple commands (with more to come!), and passes on anything it doesn’t understand to CMD.EXE. For now the only internally understood commands are EXIT and CD.
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New ConsoleWrapper version

I took the time today to make a few small changes to ConsoleWrapper which should improve usability and stability, namely: A simple caret to show cursor position and improve text editing capability — as well as the ability to use the expected left/right, home/end, and backspace/delete keys. Note that it currently displays as a | character inserted into the text, so it will push characters to the right of it across by one position.
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Sending keystrokes to the console

One of the ways Console Wrapper is currently lacking, is that it doesn’t have a full set of features that one would expect from a regular console. Some are being built in (such as command history), but TAB completion, Ctrl-C process kill etc are still missing. These could be solved (in theory) by directly passing advanced keystrokes through to the console process. ConsoleWrapper currently communicates with the console process via input and output streams.
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What is Console Wrapper?

ConsoleWrapper is, in short, a Direct3D wrapper for a standard Windows console. Output from any console application (usually cmd.exe) is redirected through ConsoleWrapper, slapped onto 3D geometry, and animated. Currently, animation is basically smooth scrolling with a small amount of perspective, but potential is almost limitless. Picture running multiple terminals at once, flipping through them like pages on a book, with full transparency, reflection, and physics effects. Lines drop into view, and discarded applications quietly fade away.
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